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APA: Website Examples

Learn how to create a paper and source citations in APA style.

Basic Website (pp. 187-192)

Numbers in parentheses refer to specific pages in the APA 6th Edition manual.

General Format

In-Text Citation (Quotation):

(Author Surname, Year, page or paragraph number [if available])

In-Text Citation (Paraphrase): APA does not require the page number, check with your instructor for preference.

(Author Surname, Year)

References:

Personal or Corporate Author. (Last update or copyright date; if not known, use n.d.). Title of specific webpage. Retrieved from URL of specific webpage

Example

In-Text Citation (Quotation):

(Gaiman, n.d., para. 6)

In-Text Citation (Paraphrase): APA does not require the page number, check with your instructor for preference.

(Gaiman, n.d.) 

References:

Gaiman, N. (n.d.). How dare you. Retrieved from http://www.neilgaiman.com/Cool_Stuff/Essays_By_Neil/How_Dare_You 

 

Corporate Author Example

In-Text Citation (Quotation):

(Human Resources Institute of Alberta, 2015, para. 2)  Tip:For the first time you cite this source.

(HRIA, 2015, para. 2)  Tip: For any subsequent citations.

 

In-Text Citation (Paraphrase): APA does not require the page number, check with your instructor for preference.

(Human Resources Institute of Alberta, 2015)     Tip: For the first time you cite this source.

(HRIA, 2016)     Tip: For any subsequent citations

References:

Human Resources Institute of Alberta. (2015). Protecting the public. Retrieved from http://www.hria.ca/protecting-public 

Tips:

  • When citing sources that you find on the Internet you only need to include a retrieval date if the information you viewed is likely to change over time (p. 192).  If you reference an article from Wikipedia, for example, you would want to include a retrieval date because such information can be subject to a lot of change.
  • Sometimes websites are missing pieces of information that you would typically include in a citation (like an author or a date). Use this table created by APA to help you deal with these sources.

Government Publication from a Website (p. 205)

Numbers in parentheses refer to specific pages in the APA 6th Edition manual.

General Format

In-Text Citation (Quotation):

(Government Author, Year, page or paragraph number [if available])

References:

Government Name. Name of Government Agency. (Year). Title of document: Subtitle (Report No. xxx [if available]). Retrieved from URL of specific document

Example

In-Text Citation (Quotation):

(Environment Canada, 2004)

References:

Environment Canada. Canadian Wildlife Service. (2004). The 1995 peregrine falcon survey in Canada. U. Banasch & G. Holroyd (Eds). (Occasional Paper no. 110). Retrieved from http://www.cws-scf.ec.gc.ca/publications/AbstractTemplate.cfm?lang=e&id=1067

Tips:

  • If a person is named on the title page, use her or him as author.
  • If no person is named as an author, use the government agency, department, or branch as a group author (Ex. 31, p.205). Give the name of the group author exactly as it appears on the title page. If the branch or agency is not well known, include its higher department first.
  • If the group author is also the publisher, simply use the word Author after the location (p. 203), rather than repeating the name of the government agency.
  • If there is a series or report number, include it after the title (p. 205).
  • The APA Manual refers to the GPO (U.S. Government Printing Office). Canadian equivalents may be: Queen’s Printer, Ministry of Supply and Services, Canadian Government Publishing, etc.

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